‘Nightly’ translates new look to L.A. as well

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NBC Nightly News” adjusted the new look it introduced earlier this summer for Los Angeles-based editions, just as it did in Washington, D.C.

“Nightly” regularly broadcasts from the network’s Los Angeles bureau inside Brokaw News Center on the Universal Pictures backlot, which is also home to KNBC, Telemundo station KVEA and Noticias Telemundo’s west coast operations.

First opened in 2014, the facility includes a glass-in studio overlooking a newsroom with several additional venues, including a video wall and corner designed to look like a set of windows.

“Nightly” previously used the newsroom view as a background but switched to using the video wall and corner space, including using it to recreate its previous graphics look.

As it did before, “Nightly” starts from in front of the video wall, with a vertical monitor displaying the date situated camera left. One of the space’s small anchor desks is placed behind where Holt stands, briefly showing an “NBC News Los Angeles” graphic before switching to a topical one framed by diagonal glassy elements borrowed from the angles of the “N” icon, though the icon used is steeper than the letters’.

Earlier in 2023, NBC updated the video wall in the space away from a low profile bezel installation in favor of seamless tiles ahead of the debut of streaming newscast “Stay Tuned Now.” That update is now being leveraged for “Nightly.”

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For other stories, Holt moves behind the anchor desk, with a horizontal video panel camera left, essentially an identical setup to how the broadcast shot the space prior to the graphics redo.

Also as done previously, Holt also intros select stories from the corner window array, which is actually created from vertically-mounted video panels.

For the kicker, Holt stands in front of the seamless video wall again, but standing to the right of the screen with the camera pointing from a different angle. 

The angled glassy elements were used again on the main video wall, as well as on the desk-mounted screen and unit mounted in the wall camera right for this part of the broadcast. 

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